top of page

C3RF Update, 12 Apr 2024 – Game on!


Canadian Citizens for Charter Rights & Freedoms
 

Remarque! La version française suit un peu plus bas



Military veteran, Eddie Cornell, discusses his experiences as a Freedom Convoy 2022 participant and victim of the follow-on imposition of martial law through the Emergencies Act.  Penniless and refused access to his financial accounts, this Medal of Bravery recipient was forced by his government to fend for himself after being driven to the outskirts of Ottawa in -25 0C temperatures.  Thanks for your service?!


Now that the invocation of the Emergencies Act has been declared unconstitutional and unreasonable, Eddie has joined with other Canadian victims to redress the loss of their civil liberties through a civil suit. Things are about to get interesting as the charges include conspiracy and assault and battery and may very well go the criminal route with both the prime minister and his deputy named as respondents. The legal proceedings will be expensive and you may help by contributing at www.tapcan.org in the “accountability project” section.


View! A video introduction of this update here


For those of you on the run and short of time, here’s a 3-minute video presentation that introduces this C3RF Update!


Summary for C3RF Update, 12 Apr 2024 - Game on
 

On bended knee


One can be forgiven for believing that Canada’s system of governance uses the concept of a “separation of powers” with each of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government keeping each other in check.  After all, bills or laws proposed by the executive need the assent of the legislative Senate and House of Commons even as conflicts in these laws are resolved by a judicial branch that is completely independent of both the executive and legislative power centres.  That’s the theory, and its a good one at that, but reality reveals a totally different kettle of fish.  One can simply look at how these supposedly disparate powers interacted with each other over the course of the Wuhan virus pandemic.  A time in which all provincial and federal authorities were obligated to address the emergency situation while fully respecting the tenets of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.


Fear reigns supreme as Canadians leave common sense in the rear-view mirror?
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms even applies in times of emergency!

Several instances can be cited in which the judiciary failed to exercise its obligation to resolve pandemic measures that were perceived to run roughshod over individual rights.  Fairly early on in the pandemic a case was brought forward in Manitoba by several church and business groups against that province.  The applicants provided a bevy of authoritative and factual evidence that detailed how badly and unreasonably the province had abrogated their civil liberties but were brushed aside by the judge’s ruling that responsible governments deserved a “margin of appreciation”.  In other words they couldn’t be second-guessed by the facts on the ground.  In yet another case that challenged the federal government on its travel mandates, the judge ignored evidence that there was no basis upon which to implement the mandates to declare that the case had become “moot”.  Apparently civil liberties go away when mandates are lifted and they are in the rear-view mirror. 


Associate Chief Justice Jocelyne Gagne rules civil liberties in the rear-view mirror don’t count and can be can be "mooted"
Associate Chief Justice Jocelyne Gagne rules civil liberties in the rear-view mirror don’t count and can be can be "mooted"

These cases, and others beyond the pandemic period, are indicative of a judiciary that is not all that independent from an executive master.  It’s as though they believe the executive is magically endowed with an infallible decision-making facility that not only merits a “margin of appreciation” but can be taken as “judicial notice” and unassailable.  The same bended knee approach can be seen to be taken by the commissioner of the Public Order Emergency Commission, Judge Paul Rouleau, when he concluded in his final report that the Government of Canada was justified in declaring the Emergencies Act in response to Freedom Convoy 2022.   He did so even though the Prime Minister’s own National Security Advisor admitted that the government did not meet the threshold for the Act’s invocation.  He did so in lockstep with government thinking that went beyond what actually happened on the ground to “what might happen” – an open-ended enterprise capable of entertaining any number of “what’s the worst thing that could happen” hypotheticals and justifying martial law just in case.


Did POEC Commissioner Rouleau “bend the knee” to an executive master?
Did POEC Commissioner Rouleau “bend the knee” to an executive master?
 

Silver linings


With courts and inquiries bending the knee reflexively to governments and their public health agencies, it’s hard to see how everyday Canadians will ever have access to their, formerly, guaranteed fundamental rights.  It is more than a little ironic, then, that the greatest abrogation of these same rights, in the form of the martial law imposed by the invocation of the Emergencies Act itself, would open the way for punishing all such incursions along with their sponsors.  After all, the invocation of the Emergencies Act, on its own, would motivate only a handful of Canadians, out of the thousands that were adversely impacted by the related loss of their civil liberties and bank accounts, to sue for recompense.  It would be this court case, filed by the Canadian Civil Liberties Union and others, that would become a silver lining capable of shining a light on all of the wrongs inflicted upon citizens who were being lorded over by their own government.


Will the invocation of the Emergencies Act prove to be a silver lining?
Will the invocation of the Emergencies Act prove to be a silver lining?

The Emergencies Act case would be presided over by Federal Judge Richard Mosley who admitted in his own ruling that, “At the outset of these proceedings…I was leaning to the view that the decision to invoke the EA was reasonable.”  He would come to change his mind, however, after haven “taken the time to carefully deliberate about the evidence and submissions”.  In doing so he would distinguish himself from other judges who skirted the Section 1 Charter commitment to “demonstrably justify” the need to smash the civil liberties of rank-and-file citizens.  Mosley would actually take the time to analyse the government’s motions to dismiss the case on the basis of “it will never happen again” and “mootness” and deemed them to be inappropriate given something as consequential as the invocation of martial law.  This was no time for the slipshod rulings of the past and, accordingly, the door was opened to the careful review and analysis of the arguments and evidence – just as the Charter demands!


Federal Judge Richard Mosley actually took the time to review the evidence!
Federal Judge Richard Mosley actually took the time to review the evidence!

Mosley’s careful and thorough review of the evidence at hand would lead him to conclude that the invocation of the Emergencies Act was indeed “unreasonable”.  It simply did not meet the threshold when it came to the absence of any other Canadian law that could have been employed and when it came to the presentation of a threat to the security of Canada as defined by the Act.  Having deemed the invocation of the Act to be unreasonable, Mosley moved on to determine whether or not the Charter rights of citizens had been abrogated.  He found that they had been in the case of a Section 8 right to be secure from unreasonable search and seizure and a Section 2(b) protection that secured for individuals the freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression.  With these decisions cemented into the Canadian system of jurisprudence until their appeal, the way was now opened for all Canadians who were so impacted by the Emergencies Act to take their own grievances to court.  Game on!


Judge Mosley agrees with Freedom Convoy 2022 protesters, their Charter rights were abused by the federal government
Judge Mosley agrees with Freedom Convoy 2022 protesters, their Charter rights were abused by the federal government
 

Game on!


The Mosley decision stands to impact the Wuhan virus pandemic judicial scene both before and after its implementation.  In the “before” instance it’s hard to see how his analysis of “mootness” and his ruling that “mootness” could not be applied to the invocation of the Emergencies Act case does not apply to the travel mandate case that was so dismissed.  The travel mandate case mounted by Peckford and Bernier, for example,  has many of the same attributes that convinced Mosley that “mootness” was not a player in his review of the invocation of the Emergencies Act.  After all, the implementation of travel mandates can arguably be seen to be as intrusive on individual rights as the invocation of an Emergencies Act and there is no guarantee that they will not be implemented in the future.  Additionally, the “social cost” of leaving the travel mandates undecided, like the Emergencies Act invocation, is large and undeniable given the public’s thirst for answers.  Good grounds for the Supreme Court to consider an appeal of the travel mandate “mootness” decision?


Did Mosley open the door for a Supreme Court appeal of the Peckford-Bernier travel mandate case?
Did Mosley open the door for a Supreme Court appeal of the Peckford-Bernier travel mandate case?

In the “after” instance we are seeing co-applicants in the Emergencies Act case waste little time in launching a new civil suit against named individuals that they see as being responsible for the implementation and enforcement of martial law.  Both Eddie Cornell and Vincent Gircys were found to have standing in the Mosley decision as they were forced to suffer through the embargoing of their financial accounts through the Emergency Economic Measures Order that was enabled by the Emergencies Act itself.  This legal suit, enabled as it was by the Mosley decision, stands to be explosive as it may very well shine a light on activities that can be seen to be criminal in nature.  It is little wonder that Eddie Cornell, in a recent C3RF “In Hot” interview, noted that it took the Liberal government less than an hour from the dropping of the 190-page Mosley decision to state they would appeal it.


Military veteran and Medal of Bravery recipient, Eddie Cornell, launches civil suit against Emergencies Act enforcers
Military veteran and Medal of Bravery recipient, Eddie Cornell, launches civil suit against Emergencies Act enforcers

The Cornell civil case stands to drive headlines on a daily basis given its allegations.  That would normally be the case given an establishment media that had a modicum of curiosity over charges of governmental and institutional abuse of process, misfeasance of public office, breach of Charter rights, injurious falsehood and defamation, assault and battery, harassment and intimidation and civil conspiracy.  The latter allegation could prove to be particularly juicy as it involves a coordinated effort by the defendants to ignore trusted intelligence and craft a false narrative aimed at pillorying and isolating the protesters.  In short, “each of the defendants ultimately assisted one another in their unlawful actions perpetrated against the plaintiffs” including Cornell and Gircys.  It may very well be that this case, following as it does from the Mosley decision, will be studied in Canadian legal institutions for generations to come.


Were Freedom Convoy 2022 protesters colluded against by an array of powerful entities who ignored their own experts?
Were Freedom Convoy 2022 protesters colluded against by an array of powerful entities who ignored their own experts?
 

Thanks for your continued support


Your patronage makes a world of difference in the ability of C3RF to educate, advocate and act in service of preserving the individual and fundamental rights of all Canadians.  Please consider clicking here to support C3RF today.  And while you're considering making a difference, please follow C3RF on Facebook, on Twitter, on Gab, on Gettr and on our web site and share with friends our great content and a realistic outlook on the continuing battle for Charter rights in Canada. You can also view our social media archive here and view our videos here as well as on YouTube, on Rumble and on Odysee.

Major Russ Cooper

Major Russ Cooper (Ret’d)

President and CEO, C3RF




You gotta challenge all assumptions. If you don’t, what is doctrine on day one becomes dogma forever after.
 
DONATE NOW!
 

Version française

Citoyens Canadiens pour la Charte des Droits et Libertés
 

Eddie Cornell, vétéran militaire, évoque son expérience en tant que participant au Convoi pour la liberté 2022 et victime de l'imposition de la loi martiale par le biais de la loi sur les situations d'urgence.  Sans le sou et sans accès à ses comptes financiers, ce récipiendaire de la Médaille de la Bravoure a été contraint par son gouvernement de se débrouiller seul après avoir été conduit dans la banlieue d'Ottawa par des températures de -25 C.  Merci pour votre service!


Maintenant que l'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence a été déclarée inconstitutionnelle et déraisonnable, Eddie s'est joint à d'autres victimes canadiennes pour réparer la perte de leurs libertés civiles par le biais d'une action civile. Les choses sont sur le point de devenir intéressantes, car les accusations comprennent la conspiration et les coups et blessures et pourraient très bien aller jusqu'à la voie pénale, le premier ministre et son adjoint étant cités comme défendeurs. La procédure judiciaire sera coûteuse et vous pouvez y contribuer en apportant votre contribution à l'adresse https://www.tapcan.org/dans la section "accountability project".


Voir! Une vidéo de présentation de cette mise à jour est disponible ici


Pour ceux d'entre vous qui sont pressés et qui manquent de temps, voici une présentation vidéo de 3 minutes qui introduit cette mise à jour du C3RF!


Summary for C3RF Update, 12 Apr 2024 - Game on
 

À genoux


On pourrait croire que le système de gouvernance du Canada repose sur le concept de « séparation des pouvoirs », dans lequel les pouvoirs législatif, exécutif et judiciaire se tiennent mutuellement sous contrôle.  Après tout, les projets de loi proposés par l'exécutif doivent recevoir l'assentiment du Sénat et de la Chambre des communes, tandis que les conflits relatifs à ces lois sont résolus par un pouvoir judiciaire totalement indépendant des centres de pouvoir exécutif et législatif.  C'est la théorie, et elle est bonne, mais la réalité est tout autre.  Il suffit de regarder comment ces pouvoirs supposés disparates ont interagi les uns avec les autres au cours de la pandémie du virus de Wuhan.  À cette époque, toutes les autorités provinciales et fédérales étaient tenues de faire face à la situation d'urgence tout en respectant pleinement les principes de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.


La Charte canadienne des droits et libertés s'applique même en cas d'urgence!
La Charte canadienne des droits et libertés s'applique même en cas d'urgence!

On peut citer plusieurs cas où le pouvoir judiciaire n'a pas exercé son obligation de statuer sur les mesures de lutte contre la pandémie qui étaient perçues comme bafouant les droits individuels.  Dès le début de la pandémie, plusieurs groupes religieux et commerciaux ont intenté une action en justice contre la province du Manitoba.  Les requérants ont fourni un grand nombre de preuves factuelles et dignes de foi expliquant en détail à quel point la province avait abrogé leurs libertés civiles, mais ils ont été écartés par le juge qui a décidé que les gouvernements responsables avaient droit à une « marge d'appréciation ».  En d'autres termes, ils ne pouvaient pas être remis en question par les faits sur le terrain.  Dans une autre affaire qui mettait en cause le gouvernement fédéral pour ses mandats de voyage, le juge a ignoré la preuve qu'il n'y avait aucune base sur laquelle mettre en œuvre les mandats pour déclarer que l'affaire était devenue « sans objet ».  Apparemment, les libertés civiles disparaissent lorsque les mandats sont levés et qu'ils sont dans le rétroviseur. 


La juge en chef adjointe Jocelyne Gagné estime que les libertés civiles qui se trouvent dans le rétroviseur ne comptent pas et qu'elles peuvent être « mises en jachère »
La juge en chef adjointe Jocelyne Gagné estime que les libertés civiles qui se trouvent dans le rétroviseur ne comptent pas et qu'elles peuvent être « mises en jachère »

Ces dossiers, et d'autres au-delà de la période pandémique, sont révélateurs d'un pouvoir judiciaire qui n'est pas si indépendant que cela du pouvoir exécutif.  C'est comme s'ils croyaient que l'exécutif était magiquement doté d'une capacité de décision infaillible qui ne mérite pas seulement une « marge d'appréciation », mais qui peut être considérée comme un « avis judiciaire » et inattaquable.  Le juge Paul Rouleau, commissaire de la Commission d'urgence pour l'ordre public, a adopté la même approche lorsqu'il a conclu dans son rapport final que le gouvernement du Canada était fondé à appliquer la loi sur l'état d'urgence en réponse au convoi de la liberté 2022.   Il l'a fait alors que le conseiller à la sécurité nationale du Premier ministre lui-même avait admis que le gouvernement n'avait pas atteint le seuil requis pour invoquer la loi.  Il l'a fait en accord avec la pensée gouvernementale qui est allée au-delà de ce qui s'est réellement passé sur le terrain pour s'intéresser à « ce qui pourrait arriver » - une entreprise ouverte capable d'envisager n'importe quelle hypothèse « quelle est la pire chose qui pourrait arriver » et de justifier la loi martiale juste au cas où.


Le commissaire Rouleau de la POEC a-t-il « fléchi le genou » devant un maître de l'exécutif?
Le commissaire Rouleau de la POEC a-t-il « fléchi le genou » devant un maître de l'exécutif?
 

Les bons côtés de la médaille


Avec des tribunaux et des commissions d'enquête qui se plient par réflexe aux gouvernements et à leurs agences de santé publique, il est difficile de voir comment les Canadiens ordinaires pourront un jour avoir accès à leurs droits fondamentaux, autrefois garantis.  Il est donc plus qu'ironique que la plus grande abrogation de ces mêmes droits, sous la forme de la loi martiale imposée par l'invocation de la Loi sur les situations d'urgence elle-même, ouvre la voie à la punition de toutes les incursions de ce type ainsi que de leurs promoteurs.  Après tout, l'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence, à elle seule, ne motiverait qu'une poignée de Canadiens, sur les milliers qui ont été affectés par la perte de leurs libertés civiles et de leurs comptes bancaires, à intenter une action en justice pour obtenir un dédommagement.  C'est ce procès, intenté par l'Union canadienne des libertés civiles et d'autres, qui deviendrait une lueur d'espoir capable de mettre en lumière tous les torts infligés aux citoyens qui ont été bafoués par leur propre gouvernement.


L'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence sera-t-elle une lueur d'espoir?
L'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence sera-t-elle une lueur d'espoir?

Le cas de la loi sur les situations d'urgence a été présidé par le juge fédéral Richard Mosley, qui a admis dans sa propre décision que « au début de cette procédure, je penchais pour l'idée que la décision d'invoquer la loi sur les situations d'urgence était raisonnable ».  Il a toutefois changé d'avis après avoir « pris le temps d'examiner attentivement les preuves et les observations ».  Ce faisant, il s'est distingué des autres juges qui ont contourné l'engagement de l'article 1 de la Charte pour « justifier de manière démontrable » la nécessité d'écraser les libertés civiles des citoyens ordinaires.  Mosley a pris le temps d'analyser les requêtes du gouvernement visant à rejeter l'affaire au motif que « cela ne se reproduira plus » et que « c'est sans objet », et il les a jugées inappropriées face à un événement aussi important que l'invocation de la loi martiale.  Ce n'était pas le moment de rendre les mêmes décisions que par le passé et, par conséquent, la porte a été ouverte à l'examen et à l'analyse minutieux des arguments et des preuves - comme l'exige la Charte!


Le juge fédéral Richard Mosley a pris le temps d'examiner les preuves!
Le juge fédéral Richard Mosley a pris le temps d'examiner les preuves!

L'examen minutieux et approfondi des éléments de preuve dont dispose M. Mosley lui a permis de conclure que l'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence était effectivement « déraisonnable ».  Elle n'a tout simplement pas atteint le seuil requis en ce qui concerne l'absence de toute autre loi canadienne qui aurait pu être utilisée et en ce qui concerne la présentation d'une menace pour la sécurité du Canada telle que définie par la loi.  Ayant jugé déraisonnable l'invocation de la loi, M. Mosley s'est ensuite penché sur la question de savoir si les droits des citoyens garantis par la Charte avaient été abrogés.  Il a conclu qu'ils l'avaient été dans le cas du droit à la protection contre les fouilles, les perquisitions et les saisies abusives (article 8) et de la protection de la liberté de pensée, de croyance, d'opinion et d'expression (article 2, point b)).  Ces décisions étant gravées dans le système jurisprudentiel canadien jusqu'à leur appel, la voie est désormais ouverte à tous les Canadiens qui ont été touchés par la loi sur les situations d'urgence et qui souhaitent porter leurs propres griefs devant les tribunaux.  C'est parti!


Le juge Mosley est d'accord avec les manifestants du Convoi de la liberté 2022, dont les droits garantis par la Charte ont été bafoués par le gouvernement fédéral
Le juge Mosley est d'accord avec les manifestants du Convoi de la liberté 2022, dont les droits garantis par la Charte ont été bafoués par le gouvernement fédéral
 

C'est parti!


Le jugement Mosley aura un impact sur la scène judiciaire de la pandémie du virus de Wuhan à la fois avant et après sa mise en œuvre.  Dans le cas « avant », il est difficile de voir comment son analyse du « sans objet » et sa décision que le "sans objet" ne pouvait pas être appliqué à l'invocation de la Loi sur les situations d'urgence ne s'applique pas à l'affaire du mandat de voyage qui a été ainsi rejetée.  L'affaire du mandat de voyage montée par Peckford et Bernier, par exemple, présente un grand nombre des mêmes caractéristiques qui ont convaincu Mosley que le « sans objet » n'entrait pas en ligne de compte dans son examen de l'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence.  Après tout, la mise en œuvre de mandats de voyage peut être considérée comme aussi intrusive pour les droits individuels que l'invocation d'une loi sur les situations d'urgence et rien ne garantit qu'ils ne seront pas mis en œuvre à l'avenir.  En outre, le « coût social » de l'absence de décision sur les mandats de voyage, comme sur l'invocation de la loi sur les situations d'urgence, est important et indéniable, compte tenu de la soif de réponses du public.  De bonnes raisons pour que la Cour Suprême considère un appel de la décision sur le « sans objet » du mandat de voyage?


Le jugement Mosley a-t-il ouvert la voie à un recours devant la Cour suprême dans l'affaire du mandat de voyage Peckford-Bernier?
Le jugement Mosley a-t-il ouvert la voie à un recours devant la Cour suprême dans l'affaire du mandat de voyage Peckford-Bernier?

Dans le cas « après », nous voyons les codemandeurs dans l'affaire de la loi sur les situations d'urgence perdre peu de temps à lancer une nouvelle action civile contre des personnes nommément désignées qu'ils considèrent comme responsables de la mise en œuvre et de l'application de la loi martiale.  Eddie Cornell et Vincent Gircys ont été reconnus comme ayant qualité pour agir dans la décision Mosley, car ils ont été contraints de subir l'embargo sur leurs comptes financiers par le biais de l'ordonnance sur les mesures économiques d'urgence qui a été rendue possible par la loi sur les situations d'urgence elle-même.  Cette action en justice, rendue possible par la décision Mosley, risque d'être explosive car elle pourrait bien mettre en lumière des activités qui peuvent être considérées de nature criminelle.  Il n'est pas étonnant qu'Eddie Cornell, dans une récente interview « In Hot » de la C3RF, ait noté qu'il a fallu moins d'une heureau gouvernement libéral pour déclarer qu'il ferait appel de la décision Mosley de 190 pages.

Eddie Cornell, vétéran militaire et récipiendaire de la Médaille de la Bravoure, intente une action civile contre les responsables de l'application de la loi sur les situations d'urgence
Eddie Cornell, vétéran militaire et récipiendaire de la Médaille de la Bravoure, intente une action civile contre les responsables de l'application de la loi sur les situations d'urgence

L'affaire civile de Cornell devrait faire quotidiennement la une des journaux, compte tenu de ses allégations.  Ce serait normalement le cas si les médias de la classe dirigeante avaient un minimum de curiosité pour les accusations d'abus de procédure gouvernemental et institutionnel, d'abus de pouvoir, de violation des droits garantis par la Charte, de mensonge et de diffamation, de coups et blessures, de harcèlement et d'intimidation et de conspiration civile.  Cette dernière allégation pourrait s'avérer particulièrement intéressante car elle implique un effort coordonné de la part des défendeurs pour ignorer des renseignements fiables et élaborer un faux récit visant à clouer au pilori et à isoler les manifestants.  En bref, « les défendeurs se sont en fin de compte aidés les uns les autres dans leurs actions illégales perpétrées contre les plaignants », y compris Cornell et Gircys.  Il se pourrait bien que cette affaire, qui fait suite à l'arrêt Mosley, soit étudiée dans les institutions juridiques canadiennes pour les générations à venir.


Les manifestants du Convoi pour la liberté 2022 ont-ils été victimes de la collusion d'un ensemble d'entités puissantes qui ont ignoré leurs propres experts?
Les manifestants du Convoi pour la liberté 2022 ont-ils été victimes de la collusion d'un ensemble d'entités puissantes qui ont ignoré leurs propres experts?
 

Merci pour votre soutien continu


Votre soutien fait toute la différence dans la capacité du C3RF à éduquer, à défendre et à agir au service de la préservation des droits individuels et fondamentaux de tous les Canadiens.  Cliquez ici pour soutenir C3RF dès aujourd'hui.  Et pendant que vous envisagez de faire une différence, veuillez suivre C3RF sur Twitter, sur Facebook, sur Gab, sur Gettr et sur notre site web et partager avec vos amis notre excellent contenu et une perspective réaliste de la lutte continue pour les droits de la Charte au Canada. Vous pouvez également vous joindre à notre fil Twitter ici et consultez nos vidéos sur YouTube, sur Rumble et sur Odysee.

Major Russ Cooper

Major Russ Cooper (retraité)

Président et CEO, C3RF​





Il faut remettre en question toutes les hypothèses. Sinon, ce qui est une doctrine le premier jour devient un dogme pour toujours.
 
FAITES UN DON MAINTENANT
 

Kommentare


bottom of page